Y.Z. Kami has created a work especially for the Parasol unit 10th Anniversary Auction now viewable on paddle8 (lot 51). This lot will be auctioned live as lot 302 sothebys1744, London, on October 18, 2014 from 2pm GMT. All the proceeds raised will go towards the Parasol unit Exhibition and Educational Events program.
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Image: Blue Dome I, 2014, oil on linen, 45 x 54 inches (114.3 x 137.2 cm). Signed and dated on the reverse. Estimate £60,000 - £90,000

Y.Z. Kami has created a work especially for the Parasol unit 10th Anniversary Auction now viewable on paddle8 (lot 51). This lot will be auctioned live as lot 302 sothebys1744, London, on October 18, 2014 from 2pm GMT. All the proceeds raised will go towards the Parasol unit Exhibition and Educational Events program.

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Image: Blue Dome I, 2014, oil on linen, 45 x 54 inches (114.3 x 137.2 cm). Signed and dated on the reverse. Estimate £60,000 - £90,000

Streamed live on Sep 14, 2014

Artist John Currin joins James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, to discuss how traditional portraiture has influenced Currin’s modern interpretation of the form. Co-presented with The Broad’s The Un-Private Collection art talk series and the Getty Museum’s Getty Perspectives series, their conversation will consider Currin’s works in the Broad collections and classic European paintings and drawings in the Getty collection.

Press Release - Cecily Brown at Gagosian Paris

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CECILY BROWN

Sunday, 19 October–Saturday, 20 December 2014

Opening reception: Sunday, October 19th, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm


Something that’s just glimpsed seems more real than something that’s fully described.
—Cecily Brown

Gagosian Paris is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Cecily Brown. This will be her first solo exhibition in Paris.

In recent times, Brown, a highly expressive contemporary painter in active dialogue with the history of painting, has been contending with the genres of figurative study and the nude ensemble. In her visible grapple with formal concerns, she conceives each canvas as a compositional flux, compressing subject and background, and incorporating a palette of bright contrasting hues. Stylistically diverse nudes—some loosely suggested, others clearly identifiable—make explicit her aim of conveying images in a barely elusive shorthand. This approach results in encounters with figures whose fleeting nature makes their presence all the more uncanny, implicating the viewer as voyeur in the visual game of hide-and-seek.

Hinting at figurative subjects from Impressionist paintings, and formulating cryptic titles from incidental sources including song lyrics and magazines, Brown oscillates between palettes of fleshy pinks and cool, verdant greens; isolated and grouped figures rendered as solid or translucent; and physiognomical features fully defined or represented by inconclusive smears. By freeing inspirations from their original contexts, she subverts the role of narrative in the construction of genre, and points to the slippage inherent in quoting from source. For example, in Hollyhocks that aim too high (2013), Brown recasts the subjects of Degas’s painting Young Spartans Exercising (c. 1860) into a lush green setting where limbs and trees intertwine; while in Combing the Hair (Côte d’Azur) (2013), the intimate boudoir scene of the nineteenth century genre painting is reimagined as a sinuous jumble of bodies that deliquesce into pulses of pinks, yellows, and blues worthy of a Côte d’Azur idyll.

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‘Interior (Innenraum)’, 1981, by Anselm Kiefer


Martin Gayford talks to a surprisingly jolly Kiefer in advance of a major new Royal Academy retrospective


At the entrance to Anselm Kiefer’s forthcoming exhibition at the Royal Academy visitors will encounter a typically paradoxical Kiefer object: a giant pile of lead books, sprouting wings. When I asked Kiefer to explain this strange object, he immediately — and characteristically — began talking about alchemy.

Lead, of course, was the material from which alchemists hoped to make gold. ‘But at the beginning,’ Kiefer explained, ‘it wasn’t just a materialistic idea, it was a spiritual one: to transform matter into a higher spiritual state.’ So, I suggested, in a way all art is alchemy: transforming one substance — paint and canvas, for example — into something else entirely. ‘Yes, certainly,’ Kiefer replied.

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Sally Mann: “The Two Virginias” | ART21 “Exclusive”

Published on Sep 12, 2014

Episode #208: Photographer Sally Mann reflects on the life of Virginia Franklin Carter (1894–1994), an African American woman who helped raise the artist and her two brothers in Lexington, Virginia. “My parents were important but Virginia may have been the single most important person in my life,” says Mann, who named her youngest daughter after Carter. They are pictured together in Mann’s series “The Two Virginias.” Mann interviewed Carter’s children for her forthcoming memoir “Hold Still,” due out in May 2015. Mann writes: “Left with six children and a public education system for which she paid taxes but which forbade classes for black children beyond the seventh grade, Gee-Gee managed somehow to send each of them to out-of-state boarding schools and, ultimately, to college.” Featured in addition to “The Two Virginias” are images from Mann’s “Deep South” series and her photograph “Virginia Asleep” (1988). 

Sally Mann’s early “Immediate Family” photographs were of her three children and husband. In her more recent series of landscapes of the deep South, Mann uses damaged lenses to make images marked by the scratches, light leaks, and shifts in focus that were part of the photographic process as it developed during the 19th century.

Learn more about the artist at:
http://www.art21.org/artists/sally-mann

ART21 “Exclusive” is supported, in part, by 21c Museum Hotel and by individual contributors.

CREDITS: Producer: Ian Forster. Consulting Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Interviewer: Susan Sollins. Camera: Bob Elfstrom. Sound: Doug Dunderdale. Editor: Morgan Riles. Artwork Courtesy: Sally Mann. Archival Photography Courtesy: Sally Mann & The Carter Family. Theme Music: Peter Foley.

Inez & Vinoodh: Transformers

The Photography Duo Map their Visual History for Aperture Magazine

Husband-and-wife photographers Inez & Vinoodh have lent their shape-shifting vision to the fashion world’s leading editors at Vogue, W and Self Service. After over 25 years of service, the image-makers have translated their fluency by guest-editing the fall issue of photography institution, Aperture. “I was interested in the history of fashion photography,” says editor Michael Famighetti of handing over the reigns to the Dutch couple for the quarterly’s first fashion issue in 20 years. “And Inez & Vinoodh’s practice is always reflecting on the medium of photography itself.” Today’s retrospective portfolio taken from the fall edition distils the duo’s pioneering use of digital effects to play hypnotic visual tricks on the viewer. Giving a rare glimpse into their kinetic psyche, the photographers embark in a dialogue on old references—Richard Hamilton’s “Fashion-Plate” made the cover—and new talents like the street photographer Daniel Arnold. 

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EXTENDED—#JeffKoons #SplitRocker at Rockefeller Center, NYC will now close Thursday, September 18, 2014