Press Release - Dan Colen at Gagosian West 24th Street, NYC

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DAN COLEN: Miracle Paintings

Tuesday, September 2–Saturday, October 18, 2014
Opening reception: Tuesday, September 16th, from 6:00 to 8:00pm



I wanted these paintings to reveal themselves during the making, similar to how the trash paintings came to be. I was thinking about alchemy. So there’s this juggling act; I’m starting and often ending with an image, but the oil paint and the process of using that oil paint will open up the possibility for the artwork to take a new direction.
—Dan Colen

Gagosian is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Dan Colen.

The Miracle paintings continue an investigation that has been central to Colen’s practice from the outset: to what extent does art come from the artist, and to what extent does it arise from forces independent of the artist? In his earliest paintings, Colen labored over precise oil renderings of banal interiors—a sloppy apartment bathroom, an adolescent bedroom, a camping tent—into which he introduced the presence of the supernatural—the Blue Fairy, Jesus Christ, twinkling cherubs, his deceased grandfather. He describes the subsequent series of Candle paintings as “portraits of God.” In these works, the space of the canvas contains the space of Geppetto’s worktable—where Pinocchio transcends his materiality to become real—and a message appears in the smoke left by a just-extinguished candle flame.

In 2006, Colen started to make paintings with chewing gum instead of paint, ushering in a long period during which he traded representational subject matter for an exploration of the medium itself. Using flowers, dirt, grass, tar and feathers, Mylar confetti, street trash, and readymade metal studs, he relinquished his controlling approach to painting, instead allowing the final result to be guided in large part by the behavior of the given material. He commented that he found the loss of control exciting, as if the paintings were taking on “inevitable forms—almost like destined forms.”


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Playing off of materiality as both texture and looking glass for New Age transcendentalism, CLEAR expands the scope of the California Light and Space Movement to encompass an ethereal and science-fictional dimension. Exploring the parallel worlds found in the mirror or imagined in the outer limits of space, each of the 23 artists in CLEAR creates a dialogue between the physical and astral self. This prose, found on an open source news site dedicated to current events, conspiracies, and esoteric realms; is an enthusiastic companion to the ideas at work in the exhibition.

CONTINUE READING…(click here)

CURATED BY STERLING RUBY
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NOBUYOSHI ARAKI
SARAH CONAWAY
THEA DJORDJADZE
ERIK FRYDENBORG
PIERO GOLIA
RICHARD HAWKINS
& MARCEL ALCALÁ
ANNETTE KELM
JEFF ONO
MELANIE SCHIFF
AUGUSTUS THOMPSON

BRENNA YOUNGBLOOD

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NIGHT GALLERY

2276 E 16TH STREET   LOS ANGELES, CA

AUGUST 23–SEPTEMBER 27, 2014

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, AUGUST 23RD, 7–10PM PT

Ending Soon - Michael Craig-Martin at Gagosian Hong Kong


"Michael Craig-Martin


Gagosian Gallery Hong Kong
Through Saturday, August 16, 2014, 7pm HKT

Gagosian Hong Kong is pleased to present recent paintings by Michael Craig-Martin.

A principal figure of British conceptual art, Craig-Martin probes the relationship between objects and images, harnessing the human capacity to imagine absent forms through symbols and pictures. The perceptual tension between object, representation, and language has been his central concern over the past four decades. During the late 1970s, he began to transcribe everyday items into “pictorial readymades” directly onto gallery walls, and since the 1990s onto canvas in conjunction with vivid artificial color. His drawings, paintings, and monumental steel sculptures are representations in the truest sense of the word, conveying familiar subjects as concisely as possible and thereby inviting each viewer’s personal response.

Recent paintings on aluminum panels, some larger than two meters square, depict a new range of contemporary objects—a high-heeled shoe, a disposable coffee cup, an energy-saving lightbulb—in an electric palette tinged with neon blues, greens, and pinks. The simplest object can become iconic. The amplified archetypes may lure the viewer into associations with his or her own corkscrew, headphones, or prescription pills. Continuing to resist any elaboration of form, Craig-Martin allows himself absolute chromatic freedom, casting the line-drawn silhouettes—which he draws digitally, then executes using paint rollers and thin tape—against vivid backgrounds of turquoise or purple. The selected colors disrupt the usual identity of the explicitly described objects, as in a subtly self-referential painting of a standard paint roller suspended in a magenta picture plane. “The drawings are as precisely like the thing as I can make them, and the color is as artificial as I can make it,” Craig-Martin has said. In this way, he uses color to “subvert” the image.

Gagosian Organizes First Show with Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

The fall gallery season is almost upon us and on September 11, Gagosian will kick off its 980 Madison Avenue venue with a series of early paintings by postwar abstractionist Helen Frankenthaler. “Composing with Color: Paintings 1962-1963” is the first exhibition ofFrankenthaler’s work collaboratively organized with the recently established Helen FrankenthalerFoundation.

“Gagosian Gallery was delighted to cooperate with the estate of Helen Frankenthaler in organizing an exhibition of her 1950s paintings last spring,” John Elderfield, curator of the exhibition, told Artinfo. “Now that the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation is fully in operation, the gallery is working with it on a number of projects, including an exhibition of paintings from 1962-63, to open at the 980 Madison Avenue space on September 11.”

The exhibition, which runs through October 18,  “focuses on a brief but critical period in Frankenthaler’s career during 1962–63, when she ‘composed with color’ rather than with line, resulting in the freer compositions that came to exemplify her long and prolific career,” according to the press release. The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation will have its second show, “Giving Up One’s Mark: Helen Frankenthaler in the 1960s and 1970s” at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in November.

— Christopher Kareska (@cwoodskares)